Lateral View
BUILDING BLOCKS OF CHILDHOOD

By: CB Bureau             Dated: February 01, 2014

While builders in Mumbai were offering luxury homes of international standards, Rustomjee redefined true luxury as giving children their childhood and positioned itself as a thoughtful builder. Zarvan Patel of ideas@work says how he helped the group reposition itself...

Advertising in real estate is simple and mostly full of tall claims. Just the location, proximity to the highway or airport or railway station, and the rate per square foot are enough to draw the attention of aspiring home buyers. But when some hoardings in Mumbai read ‘Childhoods Available’ and not the familiar ‘Flats Available’ or ‘Easy Loans Available’, there was a serious twist in the messaging.

Rustomjee Group’s campaign, created by ideas@work, was based on the emotional plea of “giving children a childhood”. This insight was brought to light by the Group’s research, conducted across the city.

Interestingly, Zarvan Patel, Founder, ideas@work, got a call from Rustomjee when he was away with his son on a vacation in London. “They wanted to create buildings that are based on children and facilities for children. Right from then I knew it would be a brilliant campaign,” Patel recalls.

Rustomjee offers buildings that have specially planned spaces for kids of all ages. “Children can explore trees, gardens, libraries, pick up summer hobbies, and learn to play music and sports,” says Patel. But when the campaign was being crafted, the construction had begun; there was nothing to show to consumers. So, instead of starting off with the campaign right away, Patel and his team created an interim campaign.

“Our work wasn’t limited to the outdoor campaign alone. We worked along with child psychologists to ensure that the whole infrastructure of the building was truly child-friendly. We worked on the music, art, theatre and other cultural aspect of the project too,” says Patel.

Amidst the clutter of real estate companies that indulge in heavy advertising, mostly on hoardings, Rustomjee was able to create a distinct image for itself — that of being a thoughtful and sensible builder.

" Our work wasn’t limited to the outdoor campaign alone. We worked along with child psychologists to ensure that the whole infrastructure of the building was truly child-friendly. We worked on the music, art, theatre and other cultural aspect of the project too "

All the ads in the campaign leave you with a thought. ‘It’s engaging, interactive and cheaper than an Xbox. It’s called a Tree’, says one; another reads — ‘What’s the carpet area of childhood?’ While Patel came up with the ‘Childhoods Available’ theme, a lot of others from the agency chipped in with the copy.

“‘What’s the carpet area of a child?’ sparked off the whole campaign. I think in Mumbai there’s no deeper question you can ask a parent,” he says. The visuals are atypical too. The look of the campaign bears resemblance to popular animation series of decades ago.

The Rustomjee campaign, undoubtedly, is one of the best works from ideas@work — one that created a flutter in the real estate advertising scene. “In just one and half years, Rustomjee became a brand. Whereas, builders like Lodha who have been advertising for 10 years, consistently spending huge amounts of money, haven’t been able to achieve this,” observes Patel.

CB

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